The Bookish Dark

Do you guys want to hear me complain about books or should i only post recommendations of things i think are good to read.

FEARLESS • Cornelia Funkeage || YAgenre || fantasy, fairy tale—-
Wonderful, dark, fun. Love the characters, love the plot, love the world. I was sad to reach the end of the book and hope the next in the series doesn’t take another three years to come out. Because I want it right now. There’s so much imagination in this series. And, FYI, this book is one example of a romance I can appreciate.Spoilers for Reckless beyond this point. You have been warned.Fearless picks up in the middle of Jacob’s search to discover a cure for the fatal curse placed on him by the Red Fairy, the price he paid to save his brother. He has exhausted every magical item he can think of, except one: the Witch Slayer’s Crossbow, which would bring its owner unlimited power. This item is Jacob’s last hope, but his search is made more difficult by a competitor, a Goyl nicknamed “The Bastard.” Jacob and Fox must race against time and surpass the efforts of the Goyl treasure hunter if they want to find the crossbow before the curse is fulfilled.As in Reckless, the dark, fairy tale world creates a rich, endlessly intriguing backdrop. Jacob and Fox are fantastic, well-rounded, sympathetic characters and I’m rooting for them to end up together.The reason I’m a fan of the romance in this book is because it’s born out of genuine caring for the other person. It’s not all about the burning gazes of sultry, golden eyes or swooning or rippling muscles. It’s about trust and attachment and affection. And attraction too, but not ONLY attraction. Funke focuses on what I feel are the more important, more fulfilling parts of romance.It’s actually been a little while now since I’ve finished this book and thinking about it again is reminding me how excited I am about this series.  Now I’m itching to read Reckless and Fearless again.This book’s got everything going for it: great, imaginative setting; authentic characters; and a plot that moves at a consistent pace, keeps readers guessing, and leads to an even more exciting mystery that opens into what I’m sure will be the plot of the next book. Oh and the writing is gorgeous. Cornelia Funke is the best.

FEARLESS • Cornelia Funke
age ||
YA
genre || fantasy, fairy tale
—-

Wonderful, dark, fun. Love the characters, love the plot, love the world. I was sad to reach the end of the book and hope the next in the series doesn’t take another three years to come out. Because I want it right now. There’s so much imagination in this series. And, FYI, this book is one example of a romance I can appreciate.

Spoilers for Reckless beyond this point. You have been warned.

Fearless picks up in the middle of Jacob’s search to discover a cure for the fatal curse placed on him by the Red Fairy, the price he paid to save his brother. He has exhausted every magical item he can think of, except one: the Witch Slayer’s Crossbow, which would bring its owner unlimited power. This item is Jacob’s last hope, but his search is made more difficult by a competitor, a Goyl nicknamed “The Bastard.” Jacob and Fox must race against time and surpass the efforts of the Goyl treasure hunter if they want to find the crossbow before the curse is fulfilled.

As in Reckless, the dark, fairy tale world creates a rich, endlessly intriguing backdrop. Jacob and Fox are fantastic, well-rounded, sympathetic characters and I’m rooting for them to end up together.

The reason I’m a fan of the romance in this book is because it’s born out of genuine caring for the other person. It’s not all about the burning gazes of sultry, golden eyes or swooning or rippling muscles. It’s about trust and attachment and affection. And attraction too, but not ONLY attraction. Funke focuses on what I feel are the more important, more fulfilling parts of romance.

It’s actually been a little while now since I’ve finished this book and thinking about it again is reminding me how excited I am about this series.  Now I’m itching to read Reckless and Fearless again.

This book’s got everything going for it: great, imaginative setting; authentic characters; and a plot that moves at a consistent pace, keeps readers guessing, and leads to an even more exciting mystery that opens into what I’m sure will be the plot of the next book. Oh and the writing is gorgeous. Cornelia Funke is the best.

Cool article

why teens love dystopia

“But what I don’t like—and what I don’t think either Seymour or Buddy would like, either, as a matter of fact—is the way you talk about all these people. I mean you don’t just despise what they represent—you despise them. It’s too damn personal, Franny. I mean it. You get a real little homicidal glint in your eye when you talk about this Tupper, for instance. All this business about his going into the men’s room to muss up his hair before class. All that. He probably does—it goes along with everything else you’ve told me about him. I ‘m not saying it doesn’t. But it’s none of your business, buddy, what he does with his hair. It would be all right, in a way, if you thought his personal affectations were sort of funny. Or if you felt a tiny bit sorry for him for being insecure enough to give himself a little pathetic goddam glamour. But when you tell me about it—and I’m not fooling, now—you tell me about it as though his hair was a goddam personal enemy of yours. That is not right—and you know it. If you’re going to go to war against the System, just do your shooting like a nice, intelligent girl—because the enemy’s there, and not because you don’t like his hairdo or his goddam necktie.”

Franny and Zooey, J.D. Salinger - p. 161

Book cover twins :) Make me want black hair. Maybe someday.

Always a Witch = sequel to Once a Witch, both fun & entertaining. If you like witchy things and time travel, definitely read them.

I just started Fallen. Too soon for opinions but seems good so far.

REQUIEM • Lauren Oliverage||yagenre||dystopia
—-
This is a sequel, there will be Delirium & Pandemonium spoilers.  Don’t read the review if you haven’t read the first two books!
 I was disappointed by this book. I thought the trilogy was on an upward trajectory, the second book being an improvement on the first, but this fell flat. Most of the characters fail to stand out. They’re like ghosts. Cardboard cutouts of people. Nothing happens until about 120 pages into the story. There’s a lot of description of nature that seems to exist only as filler. There’s no real resolution at the end, which sometimes isn’t necessary, but here seems set up only to deliver a preachy message. Here is a problem I have with the trilogy as a whole: the premise is never explained. Again, the explanation of love as a disease—who decided this, what are the accepted symptoms, how does the cure actually work, what emotions does it actually block out, what emotions that stem from love are tangentially blocked out—all this doesn’t need to be clarified in scientific terms, but I need to feel that the author knows all these things, that she knows where she’s going with the story. I need to trust in her authority. And the way the author can gain my trust is by relaying this explanation through the characters, through the ways they think and feel and interact. Did anyone else notice that there is absolutely no difference between the thoughts and behaviors of the cured and the invalids? Sure, the only cured whose POV we get is Hana’s and she has doubts regarding the success of her cure. But if the difference between the cured and the invalids is the basis for the main conflict of the trilogy, shouldn’t we be able to see the difference? Maybe it just went over my head. Hana tells us her thoughts are clearer now, but that’s all the distinction we get. I’m not even sure what “love” means in the context of this trilogy. Does the word refer only to romantic love? Lust? If I recall correctly, the love between a mother and her children is also meant to be extinguished by the cure, according to Delirium. What about self-love? Wouldn’t a lust for power come out of self-love? Unless the person had this robotic, Darwinian urge to be Numero Uno. And jealousy? And pride? Do those come out of a corrupted love? Or does the cure simply kill the ability to form bonds with other people, with little effect on emotions of passion? It’s all so muddied. After three books, I’m still not sure.
Lauren Oliver’s writing is lovely as always, and I appreciate her efforts to transcend the formula of the genre, but I’m left confused, struggling to make out the shape of the story.

REQUIEM • Lauren Oliver
age||
ya
genre||dystopia

—-

This is a sequel, there will be Delirium & Pandemonium spoilers.  Don’t read the review if you haven’t read the first two books!


I was disappointed by this book. I thought the trilogy was on an upward trajectory, the second book being an improvement on the first, but this fell flat. Most of the characters fail to stand out. They’re like ghosts. Cardboard cutouts of people. Nothing happens until about 120 pages into the story. There’s a lot of description of nature that seems to exist only as filler. There’s no real resolution at the end, which sometimes isn’t necessary, but here seems set up only to deliver a preachy message.

Here is a problem I have with the trilogy as a whole: the premise is never explained. Again, the explanation of love as a disease—who decided this, what are the accepted symptoms, how does the cure actually work, what emotions does it actually block out, what emotions that stem from love are tangentially blocked out—all this doesn’t need to be clarified in scientific terms, but I need to feel that the author knows all these things, that she knows where she’s going with the story. I need to trust in her authority. And the way the author can gain my trust is by relaying this explanation through the characters, through the ways they think and feel and interact.

Did anyone else notice that there is absolutely no difference between the thoughts and behaviors of the cured and the invalids? Sure, the only cured whose POV we get is Hana’s and she has doubts regarding the success of her cure. But if the difference between the cured and the invalids is the basis for the main conflict of the trilogy, shouldn’t we be able to see the difference? Maybe it just went over my head. Hana tells us her thoughts are clearer now, but that’s all the distinction we get.

I’m not even sure what “love” means in the context of this trilogy. Does the word refer only to romantic love? Lust? If I recall correctly, the love between a mother and her children is also meant to be extinguished by the cure, according to Delirium. What about self-love? Wouldn’t a lust for power come out of self-love? Unless the person had this robotic, Darwinian urge to be Numero Uno. And jealousy? And pride? Do those come out of a corrupted love? Or does the cure simply kill the ability to form bonds with other people, with little effect on emotions of passion? It’s all so muddied. After three books, I’m still not sure.

Lauren Oliver’s writing is lovely as always, and I appreciate her efforts to transcend the formula of the genre, but I’m left confused, struggling to make out the shape of the story.

Picture Books That Will Never Win Awards — NY Public Library

^Click to read whole article & for more books

guess what now i work at two different libraries

DIARY • Chuck Palahniukage||adultgenre||transgressive
—-This is about art and ambition and immortality. It’s about inspiration and irony. It’s about the torment of geniuses.There’s this animal, amost-hysteria in Chuck Palahniuk’s writing that appeals to me. His main characters (I’ve only ready two of his books so far) are falling apart, inside and out and then sometimes rebuilding themselves, as they strive for the extraordinary, or suppress their potential to achieve the extraordinary, like Misty Marie. The other book I’ve read is Fight Club.Diary is honest and desperate and crazy and surreal and sad and tragic. I love the idea of the “lunatic’s” ranting on the walls, the missing rooms. The conspiracy. And I always enjoy reading about the accoutrements of art—makes me want to go paint something. I enjoyed this book.

DIARY • Chuck Palahniuk
age||
adult
genre||transgressive

—-

This is about art and ambition and immortality. It’s about inspiration and irony. It’s about the torment of geniuses.

There’s this animal, amost-hysteria in Chuck Palahniuk’s writing that appeals to me. His main characters (I’ve only ready two of his books so far) are falling apart, inside and out and then sometimes rebuilding themselves, as they strive for the extraordinary, or suppress their potential to achieve the extraordinary, like Misty Marie. The other book I’ve read is Fight Club.

Diary is honest and desperate and crazy and surreal and sad and tragic. I love the idea of the “lunatic’s” ranting on the walls, the missing rooms. The conspiracy. And I always enjoy reading about the accoutrements of art—makes me want to go paint something. I enjoyed this book.

“It’s the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting.”

The Alchemist, Paolo Coelho

my mom wants me to read more grownup books.

aseaofquotes:

David Wojnarowicz, “Spiral”

aseaofquotes:

David Wojnarowicz, “Spiral”

(via headspacing)

Jami Attenberg, Instant Love

Jami Attenberg, Instant Love

(Source: aseaofquotes)

kingofthelosingside:

thebookishdark:

These babies are now in my clutches.

Find a garbage can and pitch everything but Speaker for the Dead. 

Don’t tell me what to do.

kingofthelosingside:

thebookishdark:

These babies are now in my clutches.

Find a garbage can and pitch everything but Speaker for the Dead

Don’t tell me what to do.